Continuing this blog’s tradition of filling in holidays with music videos, it turns out that there aren’t nearly as many Martin Luther King Day songs as there are, say, Christmas songs. Fortunately, there is a good one by the man largely responsible for the holiday, Stevie Wonder. That story is here, and the song is embedded above. Happy birthday!

David Lee Roth’s remake of the Just A Gigolo / I Ain’t Got Nobody medley, melded by Louis Prima and earlier covered by The Village People, peaked at #4 on the Billboard charts in September 1985.

But it was this tour de force video that lampooned MTV and so many 80s video staples that got everyone’s attention. There are two nominees for 1985 MTV Video of the Year in this clip: California Girls (seen in the opening framing sequence) and the medley itself. Both lost to Don Henley’s The Boys Of Summer.

When it comes to goofy videos, this is one of my favorites. I’ll sometimes tell someone who’s in on the joke, “You’ve got char-asthma.” And when it comes to videos about videos, this might be the best.

We continue the discussion of 80s music videos about making music videos with Phil Collins’ Don’t Lose My Number. The song peaked at #4 in September 1985, but was never released as a single in the UK.

If the song’s Wikipedia entry is to believed, this is truly a meta video. Supposedly, “Collins did not know what he would use as a video theme for ‘Don’t Lose My Number’, so he decided to create a video showing his decision process in selecting a theme for it.” In the video, Collins interviews several “directors” who offer parodies of other music videos, including You Might Think, which I covered last month. In lieu of a tidy ending, the video ends with the spoken line, “So how does it end?” So very, very meta!

Earlier, in Easy Lover, Collins shared MTV’s award for Best Overall Performance in a Video with Philip Bailey. That beat out another video about making videos, and that’s the one I’ll use to wrap up this theme next week.